Monthly Archives: April 2018

Septic Shock: Diagnoses and Nursing and Medical Management

Sepsis is one of the main reasons why geriatric patients are admitted into the ICU. To know more about what sepsis is and how septic shock happens, we will go into a bit of its pathophysiology, its diagnoses, and its nursing and medical management. Let’s begin. Sepsis The main complication of sepsis is septic shock [...]

By | 2018-04-30T06:03:35-08:00 April 30th, 2018|Medical, Student Info|Comments Off on Septic Shock: Diagnoses and Nursing and Medical Management

15-Second EKG Interpretation: Atrial Fibrillation – Part 1 of 2

We will be talking about atrial rhythms and how to appropriately interpret them. We will determine if what you see on your monitor is atrial fibrillation or something entirely different. Atrial Fibrillation What happens when your patient’s atrium runs wild or isn’t acting the way it’s supposed to be? Well, the most common rhythm that [...]

By | 2018-04-27T05:57:03-08:00 April 27th, 2018|Medical, Student Info|Comments Off on 15-Second EKG Interpretation: Atrial Fibrillation – Part 1 of 2

Hematology Lymphomas: Identifying the Difference between Hodgkin’s and Non-Hodgkin’s

After going through leukemias, we will discuss lymphomas. Somehow, it can get quite overwhelming when figuring out the differences between lymphomas, leukemias, and myelomas. Yes, it’s confusing, but the significant difference is their origin or where cancer started. In all types of leukemia – whether acute myelogenous, chronic myelogenous, acute lymphocytic, or chronic lymphocytic – [...]

By | 2018-04-25T05:43:27-08:00 April 25th, 2018|Medical, Pathophysiology|Comments Off on Hematology Lymphomas: Identifying the Difference between Hodgkin’s and Non-Hodgkin’s

Hepatology Review Part 3: The Link Between Portal Hypertension and Ascites

Part three of our liver lecture will focus on portal hypertension and mainly, ascites. What is Ascites? Ascites is what we refer to as “third spacing.”  When patients come into the hospital with massive abdomens, it is most likely because of fluid accumulation within the abdominal cavity. But why is there increased fluid inside the [...]

By | 2018-04-23T06:15:29-08:00 April 23rd, 2018|Medical, Pathophysiology|Comments Off on Hepatology Review Part 3: The Link Between Portal Hypertension and Ascites

NCLEX Practice Part 3: The Respiratory System

Hello, guys. So, here’s an intensive NCLEX practice test review where we will be solely discussing the signs and symptoms, diagnostic tests, and nursing management involving the three main respiratory system conditions – lung cancer, tuberculosis (TB), and pulmonary embolism (PE). Let’s begin. Signs and Symptoms First, we will be focusing our discussion on the [...]

By | 2018-04-19T18:41:42-08:00 April 20th, 2018|NCLEX Practice, Pathophysiology|Comments Off on NCLEX Practice Part 3: The Respiratory System

Quick and Simple Nervous System Physiology

Hello. Let’s talk about the nervous system. The nervous system is fundamentally broken up into two categories: Central Nervous System (CNS) Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) Under the peripheral nervous system is the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system. So, we’ll be briefly discussing these systems and also focus on the drugs that mainly affects how they [...]

By | 2018-04-16T23:22:51-08:00 April 18th, 2018|Medical, Student Info|Comments Off on Quick and Simple Nervous System Physiology

Nursing Management of Hemodialysis Patients

Question: Who usually gets hemodialysis? Answer: Chronic renal failure patients who have reached the end stage or stage four. This last stage of renal failure is where only 15% of the kidneys are functioning. This means that majority of the kidneys are “killed off” because of the following reasons: Increased pressure Increased blood sugar Decreased [...]

By | 2018-04-15T19:45:54-08:00 April 16th, 2018|Medical, Student Info|Comments Off on Nursing Management of Hemodialysis Patients

A Rundown of GI Disorders: GERD, Gastritis, and Peptic Ulcer Disease – Part 5

In this portion of our lecture, we will be talking about the common GI disorders, namely: gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastritis, and peptic ulcer. There’s one thing in common when it comes to these three GI disorders: increased acid production. So, whether it’s GERD, gastritis or peptic ulcer, the cause is the same. Anatomy and [...]

By | 2018-04-15T19:36:12-08:00 April 6th, 2018|Pathophysiology, Uncategorized|Comments Off on A Rundown of GI Disorders: GERD, Gastritis, and Peptic Ulcer Disease – Part 5

Acute Renal Failure (ARF): BUN and Creatinine Interpretation

In our previous articles, we already discussed the phases of acute renal failure, namely: Phase 1 – Oliguric Phase 2 – Diuretic Phase 3 – Recovery We also talked about the three main causes of acute renal failure which are: Low blood pressure Low volume Low oxygen The mentioned causes are mainly due to low [...]

By | 2018-03-30T21:45:57-08:00 April 4th, 2018|Medical, Student Info|Comments Off on Acute Renal Failure (ARF): BUN and Creatinine Interpretation

Identifying the Most Common Causes of Acute Renal Failure

Aside from pouring cement (toxins) into your washer machines (kidneys) which could automatically create massive destruction (renal failure), there are other ways that the kidneys can go into acute renal failure and these ways are broken down into three Hs. What are the three Hs that contribute to the development of acute renal failure (ARF)? [...]

By | 2018-03-30T21:27:42-08:00 April 2nd, 2018|Pathophysiology|Comments Off on Identifying the Most Common Causes of Acute Renal Failure