Monthly Archives: March 2018

Electrolyte Discussion: Learn All about Magnesium in Two Minutes or Less – Part 2

In this two-minute piece about magnesium, there are just two things that you need to remember: Magnesium = Magnum (gun) When there is magnesium, there is less excitement The Magnum To easily recall what magnesium is, you can think about it as a magnum which is a type of gun. How can we put magnesium [...]

By | 2018-03-24T06:12:31-08:00 March 30th, 2018|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Electrolyte Discussion: Learn All about Magnesium in Two Minutes or Less – Part 2

Essential NCLEX Practice Question for Myasthenia Gravis

Question: A nurse is caring for a client newly diagnosed with myasthenia gravis; understand that teaching has been effective when the patient states _______. Let the question above sink in as we move forward on our discussion about myasthenia gravis (MG) because later, we’ll be revealing the answers and thoroughly discussing their rationales. Now, there [...]

By | 2018-03-24T05:50:30-08:00 March 28th, 2018|Pathophysiology, Student Info|Comments Off on Essential NCLEX Practice Question for Myasthenia Gravis

The Two Most Common Causes of Acute Respiratory Failure

We will discuss a bit about the two main reasons why acute respiratory failure occurs. Acute respiratory failure (ARF) of the lungs is not to be confused with acute renal failure (ARF) of the kidneys, and it is significantly different from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In retrospect, acute respiratory failure simply means that the [...]

By | 2018-03-24T03:40:57-08:00 March 26th, 2018|Pathophysiology, Student Info|Comments Off on The Two Most Common Causes of Acute Respiratory Failure

Acute Renal Failure: Nursing Management and Interventions

Before discussing the therapeutic modalities of acute renal failure, we’ll be tackling a bit about your prerenal and intrarenal. So, this is basically a quick review of your prerenal and intrarenal BUN level with regards to your creatinine. You just have to remember the following: Prerenal = big BUNs = BUN-creatinine ratio is 20:1 Intrarenal [...]

By | 2018-03-17T02:44:02-08:00 March 23rd, 2018|Pathophysiology|Comments Off on Acute Renal Failure: Nursing Management and Interventions

Understanding the Effects of Calcium Channel Blockers as Negative Chronotropic Drugs

When someone says “calcium channel blockers,” the first impression that would come to mind is that it blocks the channels responsible for calcium absorption. Yes, that’s what calcium channel blockers primarily do. But the question now is, how and why? Before we dig deeper into calcium channel blockers, here’s a quick trivia question related to [...]

By | 2018-03-17T02:18:19-08:00 March 21st, 2018|Pharmacology, Student Info|Comments Off on Understanding the Effects of Calcium Channel Blockers as Negative Chronotropic Drugs

Cardiac Glycosides: Inotropic, Chronotropic, and Dromotropic Drugs

In your NCLEX reviews, one of the most common discussions that you’ll encounter is cardiac glycosides. So, what are cardiac glycosides? What are the different types of cardiac glycosides? How are these types of cardiac glycosides distinctive from one another? When we talk about cardiac glycosides, we are mainly referring to your heart’s vascular perfusion. [...]

By | 2018-03-17T02:04:02-08:00 March 19th, 2018|Pharmacology, Student Info|Comments Off on Cardiac Glycosides: Inotropic, Chronotropic, and Dromotropic Drugs

Pituitary Disorders: SIADH versus DI

Between SIADH and DI, which one retains and which one excretes too much water? If you’re a bit confused between the two, here’s a quick rundown of the two pituitary disorders that are commonly included in major exams. Posterior Pituitary (pee-pee) is for ADH Let’s backtrack a bit and review on the primary function of [...]

By | 2018-03-09T19:36:37-08:00 March 16th, 2018|Pathophysiology|Comments Off on Pituitary Disorders: SIADH versus DI

A Simplified Overview of the Endocrine System and Pituitary Gland – Part 1

The endocrine system is composed of different glands and organs that are primarily responsible for producing hormones, namely: Hypothalamus Pituitary gland Thyroid gland Parathyroid glands Adrenal gland Pancreas Due to the extensive scope of the endocrine system, memorizing every single hormone and every single function is quite challenging. Just trying to figure out what gland [...]

By | 2018-03-09T19:25:50-08:00 March 14th, 2018|Medical, Student Info|Comments Off on A Simplified Overview of the Endocrine System and Pituitary Gland – Part 1

A Guide on the Basics of Increased Intracranial Pressure– Part 1

In this lecture, we are going to do a rundown on the following: Defining intracranial pressure Causes of increased ICP Coping mechanisms Signs and symptoms of increased ICP Neurological assessments Defining Intracranial Pressure Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the measurement of the brain tissue’s pressure with the cerebrospinal fluid surrounding and cushioning the spinal cord and [...]

By | 2018-03-09T19:14:57-08:00 March 12th, 2018|Pathophysiology|Comments Off on A Guide on the Basics of Increased Intracranial Pressure– Part 1

Volume-Decreasing Antihypertensive Medications: ACE and Diuretics

Hello. Today, we will be focusing our senses on the difference between your volume-decreasing antihypertensive medications – ACE inhibitors and diuretics. Usually, the challenge when dealing with volume-decreasing antihypertensive drugs is that it’s hard to tell them apart. Somewhere along your study session, there’s confusion between heart failure drugs and electrical conductivity drugs. Here, at [...]

By | 2018-03-02T05:54:53-08:00 March 9th, 2018|Pharmacology|Comments Off on Volume-Decreasing Antihypertensive Medications: ACE and Diuretics